Summer Blog Carnival: Standing Up for Childhood


July 26, 2012 BY Elise Glaum

Every 20 seconds a child dies of a disease that could have been prevented by a vaccine. This is staggering; it isn’t right; and, it doesn’t have to be the case. By expanding access to vaccines, we can prevent 1.5 million child deaths each year. You can be a part of this change by standing up for childhood with Shot@Life.

Today’s Shot@Life blog carnival posts are all about standing up for what’s right. Let’s stand up for childhood together:

Jacqui Stewart’s mom was diagnosed with polio on her 10th birthday. She was one of the lucky ones that survived without any lasting effects. This story will be passed down from generation to generation. Read more…

Jessica Ballard, a chemist by trade, shares her perspective about why she supports global vaccines so that every child can get a shot at singing along to the radio. Read more…

Fadra Nally asks us to help stop her morbid curiosity. She has a fascination with old cemeteries. In her blog post, Fadre takes us back to the 1700s when healthcare was primitive. We’ve come a long way in the past 300 years; yet, a child still dies every 20 seconds of a disease we could have prevented. Read more…

Holly Keith, founder, editor and curator of the Little Miss Marmalade blog, had a spark lit inside of her a few weeks ago at Evo ’12 conference in Park City, UT. All it took was a group of philanthropists and some positive energy and she was saying “how can I get involved with Shot@Life?” Read more…

Can you imagine waking up one morning and the entire population of two states is gone? That’s how many kids died worldwide in 2010, but didn’t have to. In this blog post, Gina Baker, shares her stories from Ghana and asks each of you “superheroes” to do something about it. Read more…

In “When you wish upon a star…” Lyssa Sahadevan reminds us that children around the world are all the same. They wish on the same stars and give the best nighttime kisses. But, one big difference is that they don’t all have mothers with access to the things they need to take care of them, like vaccines. This is not ok. Read more…

Jennifer Walker lost her voice for three weeks this summer due to laryngitis. She felt powerless and isolated. Yet, a week later when she heard about the Shot@Life campaign, she was thankful that her illness was temporary. But for millions of children around the world, not being heard is the way of life. Read more…

Andrea Updyke’s grandmother lost 90% of her hearing to Diphtheria and her grandfather almost died of Typhoid Fever. Something as simple as a shot could have changed her grandmother’s life. For children in developing countries, increasing access to global vaccines will help give each of them a shot at life. Read more…

Sari Olschewski asks you to remember your baby’s first smile. It’s such a significant milestone that every pregnant woman daydreams about. Unless you live in a country like Sudan where the childhood mortality rate is so high that many mothers have lost the ability to cry and mourn the loss of their children. Read more…

Read more from Shot@Life's Summer Blog Carnival:
Life's Greatest Childhood Milestones
Champions of Global Vaccines

 

POSTED IN: Supporters

Comments

Submitted by Arrose on: August 6, 2012 I agree. Let's stand up for a life.
Submitted by supergluemom on: July 30, 2012 Vaccines are definitely important

Leave a Comment

 

Nickname
Comment
Enter this word:

In This Section